Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World

The very first travel guide, according to the Ancient Greeks.

1 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World

Some 2,450 years before the Lonely Planet became the definitive travel guide for the world trekker, Ancient Greece, the foremost civilisation of the time had Herodotus. The Greek historian was the first man to put together a travel list of top places you need to see before you die – they became enshrined in legend as the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World.

In Greek, the word “wonder” (thaumata) literally translates as “things to see” and whilst the Internet is saturated with ultimate lists of must-see travel spots and Modern Wonders, the original list is still very much the best. Of the 7 Ancient Wonders, only one remains intact, but the history and culture of the original homes of the world’s most spectacular artefacts still draw millions of tourists to this day, and are well worth a holiday.

The Great Pyramid of Giza

2 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient WorldThe only surviving Ancient Wonder, the Great Pyramid of Giza is the largest of the trio of pyramids that make up the Giza Necropolis. An astonishing 2.3 million blocks of stone, each weighing 2.5 tonnes (about the weight of a rhinoceros) make the towering structure one of the most awe-inspiring man-made accomplishments ever seen.

Travelling there today:

You can still see the pyramid today, by taking a flight to Cairo and then a short ride 12 miles southwest of the city.

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon

3 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World

The great hanging gardens were built around 600 BC by King Nebuchadnezzar as a gift to his wife. Queen Amytis missed the abundant greenery and exotic plants of her Persian homeland, and so the king constructed the gardens to remind his wife of home.

Travelling there today:

Babylon would be modern day Iraq, the hanging gardens were believed to be situated in what is now Al-Hillah in the central region of the Babil province, approximately 62 miles south of Baghdad.

The Statue of Zeus

4 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient WorldThe king of the Gods, Zeus is a prominent figure in Greek mythology and was a popular idol which attracted some of the world’s most beautiful carvings. The Statue of Zeus was among the most resplendent, with a robe of gold and sceptre inlaid with precious metals. Housed in the magnificent Temple of Zeus, dedicated to the deity, the statue was the impressive centrepiece of a revered holy sanctuary.

Travelling there today:

The Statue of Zeus was situated in Olympia, along the western coast of Greece, about 90 miles west of Athens.

The Temple of Artemis

6 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient WorldArtemis, the Greek goddess of fertility, hunting and the forests, was a daughter of the mighty Zeus in Greek mythology. Her famous temple, built around 550 BC was one of the greatest temples ever built. Fashioned almost entirely of marble, the temple was said to touch the clouds and shone with the brilliance of the sun.

Travelling there today:

Travellers taking a holiday to Turkey will be able to see the foundations of the Temple of Artemis which was situated at Ephesus, near Selcuk in the Izmir province of the country.

The Great Mausoleum

7 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient WorldMausolus, one of the great governors of the Persian Empire was entombed at Halicarnassus with his wife around 350 BC. Dedicated to a man of stature, the burial tomb was 135 feet high and adorned with beautiful sculptures. Such was the achievement of the architects who designed the tomb, that Mausolus gave birth to the modern word “mausoleum” meaning tomb or burial place.

Travelling there today:

Halicarnassus is in modern day Turkey and visitors taking a holiday to the popular coastal resort of Bodrum can visit the site where Mausolus was buried.

The Colossus of Rhodes

8 Wonders Ancient World Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World

Standing at over 107 feet tall (about two thirds the size of The Statue of Liberty) the Colossus of Rhodes was an enormous statue befitting its name depicting the Greek god Helios. The statue protected Rhodes from her enemies as a constant guardian looking out to sea, with one giant foot straddling each side of the great harbour entrance to the port.

Travelling there today:

The island of Rhodes is situated is the largest of the Dodecanese Islands situated in the Aegean Sea close to both the mainland of Greece and Turkey.Once you have found a cheap holiday to turkey, you should visit the Lighthouse of Alexandra.

The Lighthouse of Alexandria

1692387141 5f1bab9da9 Traveling to the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World

Towering as a beacon of light to guide ships into port at Alexandria, the famous lighthouse is believed to be the tallest building in the world at the time of its construction around 250 BC. One of the first lighthouses of its kind, the building was as tall as the London Eye Millennium Wheel.

Travelling there today:

Holidaymakers in Egypt could travel out to the island of Pharos just off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt near the mouth of the Suez Canal.

Sources: 1 , 2 , 3

Photo Sources:  1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8

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